Business Valuation

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Logo UC Berkeley Extension
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2
Average rating for Business Valuation
starstar_borderstar_borderstar_borderstar_border
Noel Sithole
Director of Analytics
2
Business Valuation

"It's hard to fully express my dissatisfaction with the classes I took from the UC Berkeley Extension finance program (Corporate Financial Modeling and Analysis, Business Valuation). I was taking corporate finance classes because my boss suggested they might help round out my skills as a corporate strategy practitioner, so my goal was purely educational, not to meet a certification or achieve a prerequisite. I was only in it to learn. As such, I was highly disappointed.

Business Valuation was horrible. The homework assignments were a joke. The weekly lectures were actual lectures, maybe 15-20 minutes in length per week (awfully short to cover a topic as complex as valuation). The vast majority of useful learning (say 90%) was from the textbook. The professor was condescending and arrogant.

The group project. What an idea to have a group project....for an online class....in a non-degree program....where 90% of students don't participate or care. This was the worst project ever. From the second week, I was the only one in the class to post the mandatory weekly discussion posts (that were part of our grades). This did not bode well for my group participants. And sure enough, my group members barely responded to my emails about the project, and they contributed a grand total of ~5% of the total work effort.

Then the final. Ah, the final. There's nothing like walking into a proctored exam and then finding significant and obvious errors in the income statement you have to use for valuation. And in a proctored setting, there is no teacher you can ask for guidance on how to reconcile those errors. These were egregious - one literally said something like "Earnings before taxes: 80, Taxes: 20, Earnings After Taxes: 80". Say what??? After the exam, I emailed the professor immediately to explain the assumptions I made given the errors. He ultimately denied that the test had any errors, and very conveniently refused to show me my exam, citing school policy.

So that's my Berkeley experience. I will never take a Berkeley class again (I hear Harvard's online courses are actually much better). Take my advice - if you're looking for corporate finance courses, look elsewhere. Or if you're just in it to learn, go buy a textbook and read it cover to cover, and save yourself the $950 per class.
" - 2019-03-16 10:43

"It's hard to fully express my dissatisfaction with the classes I took from the UC Berkeley Extension finance program (Corporate Financial Mo… read full review - 2019-03-16 10:43

Description

Enroll Now:

Online, enroll anytime

Enroll Now

  • Online course: Internet access required
  • Enroll anytime: You have 6 months to complete
  • $800 (EDP 897975) Proctored final exam



Donald R. Byrne, M.B.A., Ph.D., has taught accounting, finance and economics at several universities, including Notre Dame, Wayne State University, Central Michigan University and the University of Detroit Mercy. He is the editor of An Economics Newsletter for the New Millennium (udmercy.edu/faculty/byrned).

Textbook(s) for this course: Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies, University Edition
Author: McKinsey & Company, Inc.
Publisher: Wiley
Edition: 5th
Publication Year: 2010
ISBN: 0470424702


San …

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Enroll Now:

Online, enroll anytime

Enroll Now

  • Online course: Internet access required
  • Enroll anytime: You have 6 months to complete
  • $800 (EDP 897975) Proctored final exam



Donald R. Byrne, M.B.A., Ph.D., has taught accounting, finance and economics at several universities, including Notre Dame, Wayne State University, Central Michigan University and the University of Detroit Mercy. He is the editor of An Economics Newsletter for the New Millennium (udmercy.edu/faculty/byrned).

Textbook(s) for this course: Valuation: Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies, University Edition
Author: McKinsey & Company, Inc.
Publisher: Wiley
Edition: 5th
Publication Year: 2010
ISBN: 0470424702


San Francisco, Wed. March 20, 6:30 pm, 10 meetings

Enroll Now

  • 10 meetings
  • March 20 to May 22: Wed., 6:30-9:30 pm
  • San Francisco: Room 803, UC Berkeley Extension Downtown Center, 425 Market St., 8th Floor (enter on Fremont St.)
  • $750 (EDP 316562)


Robert Coackley, B.S., is an engineer and Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (FIET). A mentor and coach for CEOs, Coackley has more than 20 years of experience as a CEO of both public and private companies. He has been an instructor for Golden Gate University and currently serves as an instructor in public education for the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary.

Textbook(s) for this course: Note: Optional but Recommended
Principles of Corporate Finance
Author: Richard A. Brealey, Stewart C. Myers, and Franklin Allen
Publisher: Irwin/McGraw-Hill
Edition: 8th
Publication Year: 2005
ISBN: 0072957239
Textbook is optional.

AND Valuation-Measuring and Managing the Value of Companies
Author: Koller, Goedhart, Wessels
Publisher: McKinsey & Company, Wiley
Edition: 5th
ISBN: 9780470424704



X431.9 (2 semester units in Business Administration)

A requirement in the certificate programs in Finance, Corporate Finance Specialization and in Accounting, Accounting for Financial and Business Analysts Specialization; an elective in the Professional Sequence in Personal Financial Planning

Learn to apply financial and economic theory to investment, financing and dividend decisions to identify ways to maximize shareholder returns. Practical methods to determine costs of capital, total invested capital, free cash flow and economic profits are used in the valuation analysis for mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, capital budgeting, initial public offerings and private placements, leveraged buyouts, performance-based executive compensation, agency costs, control premiums, and costs of marketability and real options.

Prerequisites: Basic Corporate Finance X430.1, Introduction to Financial Accounting XB102A, Principles of Management Accounting X421.5 or consent of instructor and professional experience

Future-Term Courses and Enrollments

Courses are offered three terms per year: spring, summer, fall. Information about upcoming courses is available when enrollment opens each term.

  • Spring term: Enrollment opens in early December. Classes begin in January.
  • Summer term: Enrollment opens in early April. Classes begin in late May.
  • Fall term: Enrollment opens in early July. Classes begin in August.

Join our email list for periodic updates about course availability.

2
Average rating for Business Valuation
Based on 1 review
starstar_borderstar_borderstar_borderstar_border
Noel Sithole
Director of Analytics
2
Business Valuation

"It's hard to fully express my dissatisfaction with the classes I took from the UC Berkeley Extension finance program (Corporate Financial Modeling and Analysis, Business Valuation). I was taking corporate finance classes because my boss suggested they might help round out my skills as a corporate strategy practitioner, so my goal was purely educational, not to meet a certification or achieve a prerequisite. I was only in it to learn. As such, I was highly disappointed.

Business Valuation was horrible. The homework assignments were a joke. The weekly lectures were actual lectures, maybe 15-20 minutes in length per week (awfully short to cover a topic as complex as valuation). The vast majority of useful learning (say 90%) was from the textbook. The professor was condescending and arrogant.

The group project. What an idea to have a group project....for an online class....in a non-degree program....where 90% of students don't participate or care. This was the worst project ever. From the second week, I was the only one in the class to post the mandatory weekly discussion posts (that were part of our grades). This did not bode well for my group participants. And sure enough, my group members barely responded to my emails about the project, and they contributed a grand total of ~5% of the total work effort.

Then the final. Ah, the final. There's nothing like walking into a proctored exam and then finding significant and obvious errors in the income statement you have to use for valuation. And in a proctored setting, there is no teacher you can ask for guidance on how to reconcile those errors. These were egregious - one literally said something like "Earnings before taxes: 80, Taxes: 20, Earnings After Taxes: 80". Say what??? After the exam, I emailed the professor immediately to explain the assumptions I made given the errors. He ultimately denied that the test had any errors, and very conveniently refused to show me my exam, citing school policy.

So that's my Berkeley experience. I will never take a Berkeley class again (I hear Harvard's online courses are actually much better). Take my advice - if you're looking for corporate finance courses, look elsewhere. Or if you're just in it to learn, go buy a textbook and read it cover to cover, and save yourself the $950 per class.
" - 2019-03-16 10:43

"It's hard to fully express my dissatisfaction with the classes I took from the UC Berkeley Extension finance program (Corporate Financial Mo… read full review - 2019-03-16 10:43

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