Economics from a pluralist perspective

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About this course: Wondering why economists have not predicted serious financial crises? Shocked by economic assumptions of human behavior as self-centered and focusing only on what can be measured? Asking yourself if there are no sensible economic alternatives to free markets? Then you are at the right place to learn economics! This is the first online course that teaches economics from a pluralist perspective. Economic pluralism means that a plurality of theoretical and methodological viewpoints is regarded as valuable in itself and is simply the best way in which economics can make progress in understanding the world. This MOOC will illustrate economic pluralism not only in substance…

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When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: Wondering why economists have not predicted serious financial crises? Shocked by economic assumptions of human behavior as self-centered and focusing only on what can be measured? Asking yourself if there are no sensible economic alternatives to free markets? Then you are at the right place to learn economics! This is the first online course that teaches economics from a pluralist perspective. Economic pluralism means that a plurality of theoretical and methodological viewpoints is regarded as valuable in itself and is simply the best way in which economics can make progress in understanding the world. This MOOC will illustrate economic pluralism not only in substance but also in form. You will see not only me, a Professor of Economics, but also a pop-up Prof of our business school, who illustrates the actor perspective of firms, government and civil society. And you will meet an online student, based in Greece, who will help you through the tutorial videos in which I will explain key concepts, tools and techniques. I will not limit myself to the dominant theory, as almost every other course does. Instead, I will introduce you to four very different economic theories for the whole set of standard topics in microeconomics and macroeconomics. The theories are presented every time from broad and more interdisciplinary to narrow and more mathematical. The four theories that I like to introduce you to are Social Economics, Institutional Economics, Post Keynesian economics and, at the very end of each topic, Neoclassical Economics, for the special case of ideally functioning markets. But not everything is different in this course. Like every economics course, it includes numbers, diagrams, tables, equations, and some calculations. Why would you go through the effort of learning the basics of four theories instead of one? Because it will help you to see why many economists cannot predict crises, whereas others can see signals but are often not being listened to because they do not belong to the dominant school of thought. It will also enable you to see that it is just one theory claiming economic agents to be self-centered and focusing on the measurable only. Other economic theories go well beyond these limitations. And, finally, the pluralist approach will provide you with policy alternatives to neoliberalist policies promoting free markets. The objective of this course is twofold. First, to enable you to understand different economic viewpoints, linked to important traditions in economic thought, and basic economic concepts belonging to these theoretical perspectives. Second, to enable you to do some basic economic calculations that are important in economic life, such as calculating an inflation rate, and in economic policies, such as estimating the rough gains from trade for both trading partners, and in economic arguments, such as in calculating utility maximization with given prices and budgets. I hope you will enjoy the course!

Who is this class for: This course is for those who are curious about their economy, who want to have a better understanding of markets, the economic roles of the state, and how communities create economic value. It is also meant for those who look for solid arguments for economic policy alternatives to free market-oriented policies. And it is mean for those who are dissatisfied with their standard training in economics and would like to learn about different economic theories than the dominant one, called neoclassical economics. Finally, this course is designed for learners worldwide, with examples from all over the world, from Asia to Europe and the US, and from Africa to Latin America. The course can be taken by anyone with secondary-school level knowledge about economics and mathematics. There is no requirement of previous training in economics or statistics. The course can be done successfully using the online material only. But there is a course book available for those who like to have reading material next to the videos. The course book provides more information than we could get into the videos, but it is entirely possible and doable to follow the course without the book. You can buy the paperback version of the course book at www.routledge.com. You can also find an E-Book version on the following website: https://www.vitalsource.com/products/economics-after-the-crisis-irene-van-staveren-v9781317743088

Created by:  Erasmus University Rotterdam
  • Taught by:  Irene van Staveren, Prof. dr.

    International Institute of Social Studies (ISS)
  • Taught by:  Rob van Tulder, Prof. dr.

    Department of Business-Society Management, Rotterdam School of Management
  • Taught by:  Maria Dafnomili, PhD researcher

    International Institute of Social Studies
Level Beginner Commitment Overall workload: 134 hours for the whole MOOC. 15 topics are discussed, 5 hours per topic. The other hours will be filled with watching tutorials (14 hours), Pop up professor video's (3 hours), 8 practice quizzes (4 hours), 2 graded essay's (32 hours) and 4 graded MC quizzes (6 hours). Language English How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.9 stars Average User Rating 4.9See what learners said Coursework

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Erasmus University Rotterdam Erasmus University: a top-100 ranked international research university based in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Our academic teaching and research focuses on four areas: health, wealth, culture and governance. Erasmus University Rotterdam: make it happen.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


Introduction to Pluralist Economics



3 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: Introduction to the MOOC
  2. Video: Economics as a Science
  3. Video: What is Meant by Utility Maximisation?
  4. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about Economics


WEEK 2


Micro Economics: Individuals, Households and Consumers



11 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: Concepts of Individuals and Households
  2. Video: Social and Institutional Economics of Individuals and Households
  3. Video: Neoclassical Economics of Individuals and Households
  4. Video: Three Theories of Consumption
  5. Video: Neoclassical Theory of Consumption
  6. Video: How Does Household Bargaining Work in Institutional Economics?
  7. Video: How to Calculate the Price Elasticity of Demand?
  8. Video: How to Calculate Utility Maximization?
  9. Video: How to Derive the Individual Demand Function?
  10. Video: What about the Organization of Communities?
  11. Video: What about Gender?
  12. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about Individuals, Households and Consumers

Graded: Graded MC Quiz about Week 1 & 2

WEEK 3


Micro Economics: Firms and Markets



13 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: General Overview of Firms
  2. Video: Post Keynesian Theory of the Firm
  3. Video: Neoclassical Theory of the Firm
  4. Video: Types of Markets
  5. Video: Market Failures
  6. Video: How to Calculate the Profit Rate?
  7. Video: How to Calculate the Growth of the Firm in Post Keynesian Economics?
  8. Video: What is the Profit Rate in Post Keynesian Economics?
  9. Video: How many Workers should a Firm hire to Maximize Profit?
  10. Video: How to Calculate Profit in Neoclassical Economics?
  11. Video: What are the Key Differences between Types of Markets?
  12. Video: What about the Organization of the Market?
  13. Video: What about Markets, Consumption and Production?
  14. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about Firms and Markets

Graded: Essay on Micro Economics

WEEK 4


Micro Economics: The state



5 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: The State
  2. Video: Public Goods and Commons
  3. Video: How Can we Find the Optimal Tax Rate?
  4. Video: What about the Organization of the State?
  5. Video: What about Water and Sanitation?
  6. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about the State

Graded: Graded MC Quiz about week 3 & 4

WEEK 5


Micro Economics: Factor Markets



11 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: Labour Markets - General Concepts
  2. Video: Labour Markets - Social Economics
  3. Video: Labour Markets - Institutional Economics
  4. Video: Labour Markets - Post Keynesian Economics
  5. Video: Labour Markets - Neoclassical Economics
  6. Video: Financial Markets - Key Concepts
  7. Video: Financial Markets - Social and Institutional Economics
  8. Video: Financial Markets - Post Keynesian and Neoclassical Economics
  9. Video: How Important is Labour Productivity for a Firm?
  10. Video: What Causes Unemployment in Post Keynesian Theory?
  11. Video: What about Decent Work and Income Inequality?
  12. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about Factor Markets


WEEK 6


Macro Economics: Real and Monetary Economy



14 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: Key concepts about the Macro Economic Flow
  2. Video: The Macroeconomic Flow in Social and Institutional Economics
  3. Video: The Macroeconomic Flow in Post Keynesian Economics
  4. Video: The Macroeconomic Flow in Neoclassical Economics
  5. Video: Social Economics of Money
  6. Video: Institutional Economics of Money
  7. Video: Post Keynesian Economics of Money
  8. Video: Neoclassical Economics of Money
  9. Video: How to Calculate Consumption and Savings at a Macro Level?
  10. Video: How to Calculate the Multiplier?
  11. Video: How to Picture the Effects of Macro Economic Shocks?
  12. Video: How to Calculate Inflation?
  13. Video: What are The Causes of Inflation?
  14. Video: What about the Governance Challenges for Society?
  15. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about the Real and the Monetary Economy

Graded: Graded MC Quiz about week 5 & 6

WEEK 7


Macro Economics: Growth and Trade



16 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: Why and How of Economic Growth
  2. Video: Social and Institutional Economics of Growth
  3. Video: Post Keynesian Economics of Growth
  4. Video: Neoclassical Economics of Growth
  5. Video: Key Concepts about International Trade
  6. Video: Social Economics of Trade
  7. Video: Institutional Economics of Trade
  8. Video: Post Keynesian Economics of Trade
  9. Video: Neoclassical Economics of Trade
  10. Video: What does Demand-led Growth Mean?
  11. Video: What is Endogenous Growth?
  12. Video: What is the Consumer Surplus?
  13. Video: What is the Leakage Effect of Trade?
  14. Video: What is Meant by the Comparative Advantage of Trade?
  15. Video: What about Partnering in a Balanced Society?
  16. Video: What about the Global Organization of Societies?
  17. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about Growth and Trade

Graded: Essay on Macro Economics

WEEK 8


Macro Economics: Nature and Wellbeing & Poverty



13 videos, 1 practice quiz expand


  1. Video: Introduction and Social Economics of Nature
  2. Video: Institutional Economics of Nature
  3. Video: Post Keynesian Economics of Nature
  4. Video: Neoclassical Economics of Nature
  5. Video: Introduction and Social Economics of Wellbeing and Poverty
  6. Video: Institutional Economics of Wellbeing and Poverty
  7. Video: Post Keynesian & Neoclassical Economics of Wellbeing and Poverty
  8. Video: How to Calculate Green Growth with the IPAT Equation?
  9. Video: How does an Ecological Stockflow Model Work?
  10. Video: What is Driving Wealth Inequality?
  11. Video: What about Public Bads and Climate Change?
  12. Video: What about Poverty?
  13. Practice Quiz: Test Your Knowledge about Poverty and Nature
  14. Video: Discussion Between Your Prof and Your pop-up Prof

Graded: Graded MC Quiz about week 7 & 8
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