Build a Modern Computer from First Principles: Nand to Tetris Part II (project-centered course)

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About this course: In this project-centered course you will build a modern software hierarchy, designed to enable the translation and execution of object-based, high-level languages on a bare-bone computer hardware platform. In particular, you will implement a virtual machine and a compiler for a simple, Java-like programming language, and you will develop a basic operating system that closes gaps between the high-level language and the underlying hardware platform. In the process, you will gain a deep, hands-on understanding of numerous topics in applied computer science, e.g. stack processing, parsing, code generation, and classical algorithms and data structures for memory management…

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Didn't find what you were looking for? See also: Machine Learning, Algorithms, Computer Science, Project Management, and Java.

When you enroll for courses through Coursera you get to choose for a paid plan or for a free plan

  • Free plan: No certicification and/or audit only. You will have access to all course materials except graded items.
  • Paid plan: Commit to earning a Certificate—it's a trusted, shareable way to showcase your new skills.

About this course: In this project-centered course you will build a modern software hierarchy, designed to enable the translation and execution of object-based, high-level languages on a bare-bone computer hardware platform. In particular, you will implement a virtual machine and a compiler for a simple, Java-like programming language, and you will develop a basic operating system that closes gaps between the high-level language and the underlying hardware platform. In the process, you will gain a deep, hands-on understanding of numerous topics in applied computer science, e.g. stack processing, parsing, code generation, and classical algorithms and data structures for memory management, vector graphics, input-output handling, and various other topics that lie at the very core of every modern computer system. This is a self-contained course: all the knowledge necessary to succeed in the course and build the various systems will be given as part of the learning experience. The only prerequisite is knowledge of programming at the level acquired in introduction to computer science courses. All the software tools and materials that are necessary to complete the course will be supplied freely after you enrol in the course. This course is accompanied by the textbook "The Elements of Computing Systems" (Nisan and Schocken, MIT Press). While not required for taking the course, the book provides a convenient coverage of all the course topics. The book is available in either hardcopy or ebook form, and MIT Press is offering a 30% discount off the cover price by using the discount code MNTT30 at https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/elements-computing-systems. The course consists of six modules, each comprising a series of video lectures, and a project. You will need about 2-3 hours to watch each module's lectures, and about 15 hours to complete each one of the six projects. The course can be completed in six weeks, but you are welcome to take it at your own pace. You can watch a TED talk about this course by Googling "nand2tetris TED talk". *About Project-Centered Courses: Project-centered courses are designed to help you complete a personally meaningful real-world project, with your instructor and a community of learners with similar goals providing guidance and suggestions along the way. By actively applying new concepts as you learn, you’ll master the course content more efficiently; you’ll also get a head start on using the skills you gain to make positive changes in your life and career. When you complete the course, you’ll have a finished project that you’ll be proud to use and share.

Who is this class for: Do you want to understand how the software that runs computers works, and how it is built? Do you wish to become a more competent programmer, and get a deep, hands-on understanding of some of the most fascinating gems in applied computer science? Or... do you simply get a kick from building cool systems? If so, then welcome to Nand to Tetris, Part II! you are going to work hard, and enjoy every moment along the way.

Created by:  Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • Taught by:  Shimon Schocken, Professor

    Computer Science
Commitment 7 weeks, each week entailing about 3 hours of video lectures and 10-15 hours programming project. Language English Hardware Req You'll need a personal computer -- any kind and OS is fine. How To Pass Pass all graded assignments to complete the course. User Ratings 4.9 stars Average User Rating 4.9See what learners said Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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Hebrew University of Jerusalem Ranked among the top academic and research institutions worldwide, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is Israel's leading university and premier research institution. Serving 23,000 students from 70 countries, the Hebrew University produces a third of Israel’s civilian research and is ranked 12th worldwide in biotechnology patent filings and commercial development. The Hebrew University was founded in 1918 by visionaries including Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, Martin Buber and Chaim Weizmann. It is located on three campuses in Jerusalem and a fourth in Rehovot. Visit the website at http://new.huji.ac.il/en. Join our online learners community at https://www.facebook.com/groups/hujimooc/.

Syllabus


WEEK 1


Getting Started



2 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Week 1 Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Course Overview
  3. Video: Project 0 Overview

Graded: Project 0

Machine Language



10 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 0.0: Machine Language Primer
  3. Video: Unit 0.1: Machine Language Overview
  4. Video: Unit 0.2: Machine Language Elements
  5. Video: Unit 0.3: The Hack Computer and Machine Language
  6. Video: Unit 0.4: Hack Language Specification
  7. Video: Unit 0.5: Handling Input and Output
  8. Video: Unit 0.6: Low-Level Programming, Part I
  9. Video: Unit 0.7: Low-Level Programming, Part II
  10. Video: Unit 0.8: Low-Level Programming, Part III
  11. Video: Unit 0.9: Project 4 Overview
  12. Ungraded Programming: Project 4


Virtual Machine I: Stack Arithmetic



11 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 1.0: The Road Ahead
  3. Video: Unit 1.1: Program Compilation Preview
  4. Video: Unit 1.2: VM Abstraction: the Stack
  5. Video: Unit 1.3: VM Abstraction: Memory Segments
  6. Video: Unit 1.4: VM Implementation: the Stack
  7. Video: Unit 1.5: VM Implementation: Memory Segments
  8. Video: Unit 1.6: The VM Emulator
  9. Video: Unit 1.7: VM Implementation on the Hack Platform
  10. Video: Unit 1.8: VM Translator: Proposed Implementation
  11. Video: Unit 1.9: Project 7: Building the VM Translator, Part I
  12. Video: Unit 1.10: Perspective

Graded: Project 7

WEEK 2


Virtual Machine II: Program Control



10 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 2.1: Program Control
  3. Video: Unit 2.2: Branching
  4. Video: Unit 2.3: Functions: Abstraction
  5. Video: Unit 2.4: Function Call and Return: Implementation Preview
  6. Video: Unit 2.5: Function Call and Return: Run-time Simulation
  7. Video: Unit 2.6: Function Call and Return Implementation
  8. Video: Unit 2.7: VM Implementation on the Hack Platform
  9. Video: Unit 2.8: VM Translator: Proposed Implementation
  10. Video: Unit 2.9: Project 8: Building the VM Translator, Part II
  11. Video: Unit 2.10: Perspective

Graded: Project 8

WEEK 3


High-Level Language



11 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 3.1: The Jack Language in a nutshell
  3. Video: Unit 3.2: Object-Based Programming
  4. Video: Unit 3.3: List Processing
  5. Video: Unit 3.4: Jack Language Specification: Syntax
  6. Video: Unit 3.5: Jack Language Specification: Data Types
  7. Video: Unit 3.6: Jack Language Specification: Classes
  8. Video: Unit 3.7: Jack Language Specification: Methods
  9. Video: Unit 3.8: Developing Apps using the Jack language and OS
  10. Video: Unit 3.9: A Sample Jack App: Square Dance
  11. Video: Unit 3.10: Graphics Optimization
  12. Video: Unit 3.11: Perspective

Graded: Project 9

WEEK 4


Compiler I: Syntax Analysis



10 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 4.1: Syntax Analysis
  3. Video: Unit 4.2: Lexical Analysis
  4. Video: Unit 4.3: Grammars
  5. Video: Unit 4.4: Parse Trees
  6. Video: Unit 4.5: Parser Logic
  7. Video: Unit 4.6: The Jack Grammar
  8. Video: Unit 4.7: The Jack Analyzer
  9. Video: Unit 4.8: The Jack Analyzer: Proposed Implementation
  10. Video: Unit 4.9: Project 10: Building a Syntax Analyzer
  11. Video: Unit 4.10: Perspective

Graded: Project 10

WEEK 5


Compiler II: Code Generation



12 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 5.1: Code Generation
  3. Video: Unit 5.2: Handling Variables
  4. Video: Unit 5.3: Handling Expressions
  5. Video: Unit 5.4: Handling Flow of Control
  6. Video: Unit 5.5: Handling Objects: Low-Level Aspects
  7. Video: Unit 5.6: Handling Objects: Construction
  8. Video: Unit 5.7: Handling Objects: Manipulation
  9. Video: Unit 5.8: Handling Arrays
  10. Video: Unit 5.9: Standard Mapping Over the Virtual Machine
  11. Video: Unit 5.10: Completing the Compiler: Proposed Implementation
  12. Video: Unit 5.11: Project 11
  13. Video: Unit 5.12: Perspective

Graded: Project 11

WEEK 6


Operating System



14 videos, 1 reading expand


  1. Reading: Module Overview (start here)
  2. Video: Unit 6.1: Operating System
  3. Video: Unit 6.2: Efficiency Matters
  4. Video: Unit 6.3: Mathematical Operations
  5. Video: Unit 6.4: Memory Access
  6. Video: Unit 6.5: Heap Management
  7. Video: Unit 6.6: Graphics
  8. Video: Unit 6.7: Line Drawing
  9. Video: Unit 6.8: Handling Textual Output
  10. Video: Unit 6.9: Input
  11. Video: Unit 6.10: String Processing
  12. Video: Unit 6.11: Array Processing
  13. Video: Unit 6.12: The Sys Class
  14. Video: Unit 6.13: Project 12: Building the OS
  15. Video: Unit 6.14: Perspective

Graded: Project 12

WEEK 7


Postscript: Fun to Go



4 videos expand


  1. Video: Unit 7.1: Fun To Go
  2. Video: Unit 7.2: Fun To Go
  3. Video: Unit 7.3: Fun To Go
  4. Video: Unit 7.4: Fun To Go
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